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The test distinguishes between clear, carrier and affected dogs. Clear dogs have no copies of the mutant gene responsible for the condition and will neither develop the condition nor pass the gene on to their offspring. Carrier dogs have one copy of the normal gene and one copy of the mutant gene and so will pass the mutant gene to approximately half of their offspring. Affected dogs have two copies of the mutant gene that causes the condition and will develop the disease

This is a condition where the lens is partially or fully dislocated from the threads that hold it in position within the eye. These tiny threads, sometimes called ligaments are known as zonules and it is they that weaken and break causing this condition. How quickly and how many break determines the speed of onset of this condition. Using normal ophthalmic instruments (such as your own vet may possess) it is difficult to even see these small threads. What the experienced ophthamist (not your own vet) should also be looking for is a wobble in the lens as the dog moves his head around. This indicates that the zonules are becoming weak. Weak zonules is called subluxated, completely detached (luxated)

Unfortunately, each eye can behave differently, so a rapid onset on one eye, may or may not lead to a gradual (and predictable) onset with the other. As this appears to be a genetic defect in dogs, then it is almost certain that eventually both eyes will be effected.

There are two directions in which the lens can go: forward and backward. Forward in called anterior luxation. Backwards is called posterior luxation. The lens can also detach at an angle which can cause bruising of the cornea (edema of the cornea). This causes the cornea to loose its transparency in the area of contact. This may or may not be permanent.